About the Author

James C. Capretta

James C. Capretta

New Atlantis Contributing Editor James C. Capretta is an expert on health care and entitlement policy, with years of experience in both the executive and legislative branches of government. E-mail: jcapretta@aei.org.


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James C. Capretta’s Latest New Atlantis Articles

 Health Care with a Conscience” (Fall 2008) 

 Health Care 2008: A Political Primer” (Spring 2008) 

 The Clipboard of the Future” (Winter 2008)

 

 More on James C. Capretta

Text Patterns - by Alan JacobsFuturisms - Critiquing the project to reengineer humanity

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Gazing Into CBO's Crystal Ball 

Over at Kaiser Health News, I have a new article looking more broadly at the fiscal sleight of hand that has gone into making the health care law seem far less expensive than it is:

In total, federal spending on the nation’s main retirement and health programs will jump by 5.6 percent of GDP over the next quarter century, and that assumes all of the Medicare cuts enacted in the health law go into effect as written.

But that is almost certain not to happen....

CBO did everyone a favor by producing an alternative baseline forecast which does not assume these Medicare reductions continue cutting deeper into rates after 2020. In 2035, in CBO’s alternative baseline, health entitlement spending including Medicare would reach 10.9 percent of GDP, or a full 1.2 percent of GDP higher than the baseline that assumes the unrealistic Medicare cuts will continue forever....

The primary threat to the nation’s long-term prosperity is runaway federal entitlement spending. Entitlement costs are set to rise so fast and so quickly that the implications for federal deficits and debt are staggering. If allowed to stand, the health law has dramatically reduced the flexibility of the federal government to respond to the coming budget crisis. It locks in massive new spending commitments, and uses every trick in the book to make it look like those commitments have been paid for.

Read the full analysis here.

posted by James C. Capretta | 2:54 pm
Tags: CBO, federal spending, economic forecasts