Obamacare implementation


Itís Already Too Late to Avoid the Train Wreck

Though the administration has secured a month’s reprieve from the woes of implementing the Affordable Care Act by promising that the dysfunctional online enrollment system will be up and running by the end of November, as I argue in a column at e21, the delayed launch of the program has already caused serious problems that will not be solved by fixing the healthcare.gov website.

The immediate problem for the administration is that even with a perfectly functional enrollment and data transmission system, it would be challenging to process new insurance enrollments of 4 million or so people in a two week period. Given the track record of healthcare.gov to date, it is highly unlikely that the system will be able to handle that much volume in that short of a time frame.

Moreover, it is also completely unrealistic, not to mention unreasonable, to expect so many Americans to suddenly become comfortable again with healthcare.gov, enter their personal financial information into it, and then select an insurance plan—in just a two-week period. For starters, contrary to the president’s assertions, many of the current enrollees in individual market plans will not be impressed by the premiums, cost-sharing requirements, and provider networks of the exchange plans. If and when the web site becomes more operational, the administration will face another political firestorm from the rate shock that is built into Obamacare’s cost structure.

You can read the rest of the column here.  On Monday, I appeared on the Kudlow Report to talk about what should be done to mitigate the Obamacare train wreck, and you can watch a portion of that segment here.

posted by James C. Capretta | 11:30 am
Tags: Obamacare implementation
File As: Health Care

Obamacare's Mugged by Reality Moment

With the serious setbacks facing the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, it is starting to look like it would be best for opponents of the law to wait for the disaster to unfold to reap the political benefits of its collapse in 2014.

But, as I argue in a column at The Weekly Standard, pushing for delaying the individual mandate should remain a key part of the GOP's opposition to the law in the months ahead.

There are many conservatives who fully expect the law to collapse under its own immense weight, and who anticipate that they will reap the political benefits of that collapse in 2014 no matter what they do now. So why engage in another politically risky showdown with the president?

Certainly the GOP shouldn’t repeat the mistaken tactics of the last month. But there’s every reason to continue making a delay of the individual mandate the GOP’s top priority in the negotiations with the Obama administration and Senate Democrats over the coming months.

For one thing, there will never be a better time to press the case for a mandate delay. The rollout of Obamacare is a complete mess. The voters can see for themselves that enrollment in Obamacare is a completely unreasonable proposition at this stage, even with the administration’s recent announcement that it will treat any enrollment commitments made before April 1 as satisfying the coverage requirement (previously, the cut-off to avoid the uninsured tax was thought to be mid-February, because the law allows for three months without coverage in a calendar year and it can take several weeks to go from an enrollment submission to initiation of insurance coverage). It should be obvious that the system for determining subsidy amounts for households has not been tested nearly enough to ensure it is reliable and will not waste billions in taxpayer dollars. It will be impossible for the administration to continue its defense of the individual mandate if these conditions remain substantially unchanged through the end of 2013.

You can read the rest of the column here.

posted by James C. Capretta | 2:13 pm
Tags: Obamacare implementation, individual mandate
File As: Health Care