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Last updated on October 25, 2016.

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Errata 

Editor's Note: The list below reflects the passages in the first printing of “Sexuality and Gender” that have been corrected in the web edition. As noted below, these passages have also been corrected in subsequent printings of “Sexuality and Gender.”


• Preface, page 6, paragraph 4: The word “to” has been inserted in the last sentence of the paragraph, so that the passage now reads “... compared to the population as a whole.” This change is reflected in the online edition and in the second printing of “Sexuality and Gender.”

Part One, page 35, paragraph 3: The original text of this paragraph mistakenly stated that estradiol is metabolized into testosterone, when in fact the opposite is true — estradiol can be metabolized from testosterone. This point is not central to the meaning of the paragraph, but for the sake of accuracy, the following parenthetical has been deleted: “(which can be metabolized into testosterone).” This change is reflected in the online edition and in the second printing of “Sexuality and Gender,” but not in all the online translations. Thanks to Professor Jean Wilson of UT Southwestern Medical Center for pointing out this error.

Part One, page 47, paragraph 3: This paragraph discusses a paper by psychologist Marie E. Tomeo and colleagues (“Comparative Data of Childhood and Adolescence Molestation in Heterosexual and Homosexual Persons,” 2001) that reports on the rates of sexual abuse among samples of homosexual men and women. The Tomeo et al. paper contains contradictory data: In one part of the paper (pages 540–541), the authors write that 68% of homosexual men interviewed did not identify as homosexual until after they were molested, but in a table appearing elsewhere (page 538) the 68% figure is explained as the percentage of homosexual men identified as homosexual before they were molested (which would presumably mean that around 32% of the men would have identified as homosexual after they were molested). Although the figure is not central to the analysis presented in “Sexuality and Gender,” the relevant paragraph has been edited to reflect the discrepancy in the Tomeo et al. paper. This change is reflected in the online edition and in the second printing of “Sexuality and Gender,” but not in all the online translations. Thanks to Professor Warren Throckmorton of Grove City College for pointing out this error in the Tomeo et al. paper, which he discovered and first blogged about in 2009.